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Dijon Mustard Substitutes That'll Be Superbly Apt Replacements

Dijon Mustard Substitutes
Dijon mustard is an essential ingredient for marinating meat and poultry and for making salad dressing. If you are looking for a substitute for Dijon mustard, then we have them listed below.
Tastessence Staff
Last Updated: Mar 12, 2018
We cannot think of a piece of succulent steak or a good vinaigrette without the distinctive taste of Dijon mustard. Dijon mustard first originated in a place called Dijon in France. It is made with black or brown mustard seeds which is ground to a smooth paste along with verjuice i.e. juice of unripe grapes. It has a smooth texture and its flavor is not too acidic. Dijon mustard gives a marinade or vinaigrette its characteristic piquant taste. Although there are many different types of mustard available; which is typically made with black or brown mustard seeds and vinegar in various proportions, Dijon mustard is the only mustard which uses verjuice. This gives Dijon mustard its characteristic smooth texture and makes it more mild and palatable. It does not contain any artificial flavorings or preservatives which makes it the most popular choice among people. Be that as maybe, if you are out of Dijon mustard or simply do not care for its rich pungent taste, then you need a Dijon mustard substitute. There are many Dijon mustard alternatives and you can choose the best one depending on what you are cooking.

Substitute #1
This is a very good substitute for Dijon mustard and is best suited for marinating pork chops or ribs. It also works well with vegetables like grilled baby carrots and asparagus.

Ingredients
  • 1 tablespoon brown mustard seeds
  • 1 teaspoon white wine vinegar
  • 1 tablespoon mayonnaise
  • ¼ teaspoon granulated sugar
  • 1 teaspoon water
Method

In a food processor, blend the mustard seeds with the white wine vinegar and water until you have a smooth paste. Make sure that the paste is not grainy but smooth. Now add in the mayonnaise and sugar and whiz it again to get mustard paste.

Substitute #2
This is a kind of flavored mustard substitute that uses dried tarragon leaves and garlic powder to give the mustard more depth of flavor.

Ingredients
  • 2 tablespoons brown mustard
  • ¼ cup powdered mustard
  • ¼ cup water
  • 1 teaspoon dried tarragon leaves
  • ¼ teaspoon garlic powder
  • 2 tablespoons rice wine vinegar
  • 1 teaspoon coarse sea salt
Method

In a food processor, grind the mustard seeds and mustard powder with water and rice wine vinegar into a fine paste. Add the dried tarragon leaves, garlic powder and coarse sea salt and mix it again. Place this mixture in a small jar and refrigerate for a week or two.

Substitute #3
For this Dijon mustard substitution recipe, honey is used to cut down the pungent taste and aroma of home-made mustard paste and a mild unflavored oil is used for preserving this prepared mustard for a longer period. This is an excellent recipe for making vinaigrettes and salad dressing.

Ingredients
  • ½ cup dry mustard
  • 1 large white onion
  • 4 garlic cloves
  • 1 tablespoon sunflower oil
  • 2 teaspoons coarse sea salt
  • 4 tablespoons honey
  • 2 cups dry white wine
Method

Peel and finely chop the onion. Mince the garlic and add it to the chopped onions. In a saucepan, pour the dry white wine, add the minced garlic and chopped onions and let this mixture simmer for 10 to 12 minutes. When the wine has reduced to half, remove saucepan from heat and let it cool down. Strain the wine mixture through a strainer and discard onions and minced garlic. Now you have a flavored wine which is infused with garlic and onion. Add the honey, sunflower oil and salt to the flavored wine along with dry mustard. Place the saucepan back on the burner and reduce the mixture till you have a thick paste. Cool and store in a clean jar and refrigerate.

So, these were some substitutes of Dijon mustard that you can use. You can also use a bit of grated horseradish mixed with sour cream as a substitute for Dijon mustard. Once you start using these substitutes in your recipes, you might come up with your own variations to suit your taste better.
Dry wine
Jar of honey with dipper, isolated on white
Olive oil Bottle
White onion
Oil and Vinegar
Dried Herbs and Spices: Garlic Powder
Tarragon leaves in bowl
Mustard powder
Bowl of mayonnaise
Jug filled with white wine
Whole brown mustard seeds
Glass of Red Grape Juice